Georges van Son's Cryptostephanus.

Russell, G. 2009. Georges van Son's Cryptostephanus. Clivia 11 : 22-26.

I must plead to being guilty of something of which I accuse others, often. This is my sin: I did not go back to primary sources and took the shortcut of accepting something written by someone else who was not the originator of the material.
In his book Clivias, Koopowitz did not understand the basic structural differences between the flowers of the three species of the genus Cryptostephanus. Whereas I researched Cryptostephanus vansonii properly and completely for my article, I had the idea in the back of my mind that there was little to be found anywhere on C. densiflorus and thus I accepted Koopowitz's material on that subject.
More recently I have started looking into the C. densiflorus material (which is not quite as sparse as I had originally thought), and it was then that I found the discrepancies between what Koopowitz said and reality. On realising this, I immediately contacted Claude Felbert, who had been doing the layout of Clivia 11, to see if there was still an opportunity for correction - but alack and alas Clivia 11 had already gone to the printers.

Firstly, to correct Koopowitz's book Clivias regarding this:
On page 57, at the bottom, he offers a key to the species. It should read:

        Key to the Species of Cryptostephanus
        1a. Corona of 6 segments, flowers pale.............................C. vansonii
        1b. Corona of 12 segments, flowers dark...........................................2
        2a. Stigma and stamens enclosed within floral tube.........C. densiflorus
        2b. Stigma and stamens exserted............................ C. haemanthoides

On page 58 under "Cryptostephanus densiflorus Welwitsch", at the end of the first paragraph; replace "There are only six coronal segments (other species have twelve),....." with "There are twelve coronal segments.....".

Here is the evidence for the above corrections:


A flower of Cryptostephanus vansonii cut open and spread out to show its structure. As may be seen, the corona comprises only six segments. The arrangement of the stamens which are inserted in two ranks is interesting and unique in the genus.
This image comes from Verdoorn, I.C. 1943. Cryptostephanus vansonii. Flowering Plants of South Africa 23: t. 885 and was drawn by Edith K. Burges.

    
Left. A section through a flower of Cryptostephanus densiflorus, from the drawing by D. Blair, FLS, published in the Journal of Botany, British and Foreign, n.s. 7: t. 197. (July, 1878.)
Right: The internal structure of a flower of Cryptostephanus densiflorus cut through one side and flattened, drawn after Friedrich Welwitsch's diagram on the type sheet from the Natural History Museum (BM), London (Welwitsch 4027 - BM000911833). The twelve segments of the corona may clearly be seen.



Top A flower of Cryptostephanus haemanthoides extracted from a photo posted on Flickr by the nursery Floralarchitecture, and used with their permission and my thanks. © 2009 John Ingram.
Bottom: the 'boss' of the above flower showing the exserted pistil and stamens; and the twelve coronal segments which form a tube to contain the pistil and six stamens. © 2009 John Ingram.
The original photographs of this fabulous species can be seen at Flickr

Regarding my article, "Georges van Son's Cryptostephanus"; the paragraph affected by the above is the one commencing at the bottom of the second column of p. 22 and continuing into the first column of p.23. Here is the original paragraph edited by mark up:

On close examination of the flowers, Welwitsch observed that hidden within the flowers of his plants, at the top of the floral tube, there were six twelve small appendages pointing outwards that look like a crown or corona. The genus name Cryptostephanus is derived from the Greek words kruptoV (transliterating as 'kruptos') meaning 'hidden' and stefanoV (transliterating as 'stephanos') meaning 'crown' (the names Steven, Stephanie, Esteban, etc. all mean 'Crown'). The crown may be seen in all three currently-accepted species of Cryptostephanus, and in C. vansonii and C. haemanthoides this crown is even more elaborate, as each of the six processes is bifurcated towards the tip yielding a crown with twelve ornamentations. that in C. haemanthoides being similar to the type-species, but in C. vansonii there are only six processes each of which is bifurcated at the tip. Crown-like structures................

And this is how it should be rendered:

On close examination of the flowers, Welwitsch observed that hidden within the flowers of his plants, at the top of the floral tube, there were twelve small appendages pointing outwards that look like a crown or corona. The genus name Cryptostephanus is derived from the Greek words kruptoV (transliterating as 'kruptos') meaning 'hidden' and stefanoV (transliterating as 'stephanos') meaning 'crown' (the names Steven, Stephanie, Esteban, etc. all mean 'Crown'). The crown may be seen in all three currently-accepted species of Cryptostephanus, that in C. haemanthoides being similar the the type-species, but in C. vansonii there are only six processes each of which is bifurcated at the tip. Crown-like structures................

The following is a list of the other errors to be found in the piece:
p. 22, col 1, line 15 - Koopowitz's book is called 'Clivias' not "Clivia".
p. 24, col 2, line 5 - "...habit of which was thought to resemble that of a..."
p. 25, col 1, line 1 and 6 -
vansonii vansoni (the double i ending is not used in eponymous zoological species, only botanical).
p. 25, the map - "Key to altitudes in offset map" - bottom colour -
400-1800m 400-1000m.
The larger map unfortunately came without a scale, so I created one, but somewhere in the rather complicated calculations, I messed up by exactly a factor of two - the scale is half the size it should be, the 250km line should actually be the 125km line.
So the repaired map is also available, if you want it - click HERE.

Should anyone encounter further problems with this piece, please let me know.
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